havana-live-taxi-cubaA SOUTHGATE cabbie with a passion for the achievements of the Cuban revolution is donating his London taxi to a museum in the Caribbean island’s capital Havana.
Tony Caccavone, 70, of Conway Road, is sending his Cuban-themed cab to the Havana Motor Museum in the heart of Old Havana after 16 years of service in which the Hackney carriage has clocked up just under 400,000 miles. Mr Caccavone has driven the black cab,which carries an advertisement for Cuban holidays and has the island’s flag painted on the bonnet and roof, around the capital in an attempt to “tell the other story” about the island. He became interested in the nation when he picked up a Canadian tourist in 1995, who told him it was a popular destination for his countrymen and women.
A year later, the cabbie and his late wife Christina flew on holiday to the island, which has been subject to a commercial, economic, and financial embargo by the United States since 1960 after the US-backed Batista regime was deposed by the revolution led by Fidel Castro. “When I got there, I got very angry about the poverty and lack of products in shops because of the embargo,” he told the Advertiser. “But look at what the country has achieved despite it – more doctors per capita than any other country in the world, very low infant mortality rates, most of its lawyers and politicians are women and there is no racism.”
Mr Caccavone said that when he returned from that holiday he went to the Cuban embassy in London, where he learned about the Cuba Solidarity Campaign and decided to paint the nation’s colours on the cab. He added: “I wanted to tell the other side of the story. I have taken politicians, lawyers and diplomats around London and told them about the Cuban revolution. I used to especially love driving around the American embassy.
“The museum will be the cab’s final resting place, its spiritual home. My gift is a homage to the resilience of the Cuban people.”
In 1997, Mr Caccavone shipped his cab to New York, where he led a convoy of more than 50 vehicles across the border with Canada in protest against the US embargo.
The group flew to Cuba afterwards and Mr Caccavone met Castro, who thanked the taxi driver for his efforts.
The taxi will be shipped to Havana next month.
Mr Caccavone, who has no plans to retire, is now driving a regular rented black cab.

By Koos Couvée North London Press